Digital full-size Drawing on Cd Scale 1/200 SCHARNHORST Experienced Builder No Building Notes
Digital full-size Drawing on Cd Scale 1/200 SCHARNHORST Experienced Builder No Building Notes
Digital full-size Drawing on Cd Scale 1/200 SCHARNHORST Experienced Builder No Building Notes
Digital full-size Drawing on Cd Scale 1/200 SCHARNHORST Experienced Builder No Building Notes
Digital full-size Drawing on Cd Scale 1/200 SCHARNHORST Experienced Builder No Building Notes

Digital full-size Drawing on Cd Scale 1/200 SCHARNHORST Experienced Builder No Building Notes

Regular price $5.99
Unit price  per 

Description

Digital full-size Drawing on Cd

Not a printed plan and no material supplied

SCHARNHORST

Digital Full-Size Drawing prints on a 58” x 24” sheet

Digital one-page article

Digital Files are TIFF, JPEG and PDF

Printing………..MAY BE DONE AT A COPY HOUSE

 …………………………ALSO INCLUDED INSTRUCTIONS FOR PRINTING AT HOME

Scale 1/200

Length 46 1/4”

Beam 5 7/8”

Power Electric

Suitable for Radio Control

Experienced Builder No Building Notes

Ask a layman of forty or so to name a couple of wartime German ships and the chances are he'll say Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. Their escape through the Channel from Brest in February, 1942, was one of the big sea stories of the war; the Gneisenau, after mine damage, dropped out of things, but the Scharnhorst subsequently menaced the Russian convoys for eighteen months or so, until the end of 1943, when the Duke of York, supported by cruisers and destroyers, interposed herself between the raider and her Norwegian base. Shooting started on Boxing Day, and an early hit destroyed the German's radar; the weather was misty, so that she was in effect blinded. Destroyer attacks slowed her, further gunfire from the Duke crippled her, and the cruisers finished her off with torpedoes. Of her crew of nearly 1,500, only three dozen survived.

   The two ships were sisters, and at 26,000 tons and 741 ft. length the biggest of the German fleet except for the Tirpitz and Bismarck. Both were laid down in 1934, when the Versailles Treaty had ceased to have any meaning; the Scharnhorst was launched at Wilhelmshaven in October 1936 and completed in January 1939, the Gneisenau launched December '36 and completed May '38.

30 DAY NO QUESTIONS ASKED GUARANTEE

 Thank You for Looking

Reviews