Free Shipping U.S.A and Canada | Small charge for international Does not include Digital Files on Cd

Digital full size plans on Cd Scale 1:96 C-class light cruiser HMS Curacoa Suitable for Radio control
Digital full size plans on Cd Scale 1:96 C-class light cruiser HMS Curacoa Suitable for Radio control
Digital full size plans on Cd Scale 1:96 C-class light cruiser HMS Curacoa Suitable for Radio control
Digital full size plans on Cd Scale 1:96 C-class light cruiser HMS Curacoa Suitable for Radio control
Digital full size plans on Cd Scale 1:96 C-class light cruiser HMS Curacoa Suitable for Radio control
Digital full size plans on Cd Scale 1:96 C-class light cruiser HMS Curacoa Suitable for Radio control
Digital full size plans on Cd Scale 1:96 C-class light cruiser HMS Curacoa Suitable for Radio control

Digital full size plans on Cd Scale 1:96 C-class light cruiser HMS Curacoa Suitable for Radio control

Regular price $5.99
Unit price  per 

Description

Digital full size plans on Cd

Not a printed plan and no material supplied

HMS Curacoa

C-class light cruiser.

Digital Full Size Plan prints on two sheets 60” x 36” and 50” x 22”

Note: These drawing are for experience builders

No building notes

Digital Files are TIFF,JPEG and PDF

Printing………..MAY BE DONE AT A COPY HOUSE

 …………………………ALSO INCLUDED INSTRUCTIONS FOR PRINTING AT HOME

Scale 1:96

length 57 1/2"

Beam 5 1/2"

Suitable for Radio control

Named after the island Curaçao in the Caribbean Sea, was a Ceres group

From Wikipedia

In 1942, she became one of the Royal Navy's major accidental losses during the Second World War.

On 2 October 1942 about 60 km north of the coast of Ireland she was escorting the ocean line RMS Queen Mary carrying 10,000 American troops to join the Allied forces in Europe. Queen Mary was steaming an evasive zig-zagging course; eight minutes to starboard, eight minutes to port then the resumption of her base course for four minutes before starting the cycle again, which Curacoa could not match because of deterioration of her engines. Curacoa was hard pressed to keep pace with the liner as it was and her Captain opted to forego the zig-zag so as to be able to maintain a position from which to provide effective anti-aircraft watch. At 2:15 PM the Queen Mary started the starboard turn for the first leg of her zig-zag, cutting across the path of the Curacoa with insufficient clearance, striking her amidships at a speed of 28 knots and cutting her in two. The Curacoa sank in six minutes, about 100 yards from the Queen Mary. Due to the risk of U boat attacks, the Queen Mary did not assist in rescue operations and instead steamed onward with a damaged bow

Thank you for looking

 

 

Reviews