Full Size Printed Plan 1963 Control Line Stunt SKYSCRAPER W/S 60" Engine .45 by BOB PALMER

$29.95


Full Size Printed Plan & Building Notes

No materials. Plan only

Vintage plan from 1963

SKYSCRAPER

Full size printed plans on two 45" x 36" and 35" x 24" sheets

Six page article with building notes

Control Line Stunt

Wingspan 60"

Engine .45

by BOB PALMER

 BIG — BIG — BIG IS ABOUT THE BEST WAY TO DESCRIBE OUR STUNTER WHICH IS BIG IN SIZE AND BIG IN PERFORMANCE. DESIGNED TO PERFORM WITH BIG ENGINES OPERATING AT FOUR CYCLES.

the "Skyscraper" a 60" .45 powered stunter plane. Trends in hobbies do change and Stunt had a major one in 1949. I was connected with that change and in the past few years, have thought a .45 stunter would be still better. With the advent of the .45 RC engine designed by Clarence Lee and the fact that Lew MacFarland won in 1961 with a .45 powered Shark design, also, Brian Horrocks's Australian design, started me seriously considering

BIG STUNT.

What I had in mind was to have a model fly slower than a .35 as it will only slow down so far, to fly any slower a pilot really would have to work. A model should fly clean through all the stunts without hesitation, therefore a .45 running at full 4-cycle would fly slower and still have reserve power to fly clean stunts. Also, a .45 running at full 4-cycle should run at constant speed at all times going up or down. This constant speed will improve flying as timing is always the same when turning the model. So with this in mind, started to design the model and must say that, of all the models I have designed, more drawing and redrawing as well as figuring were needed to produce this one design.

I have flown the ship quite a number of flights now and haye found it to be what I was looking for in BIG STUNT. Longer lines and constant speed have resulted in precise stunts. It does not over control and doesn't jump like a .35 model, all movements are precise. Even after not flying for awhile, then flying again, I noticed that if you know how to stunt very little practice is necessary to get back in the groove. Once you have flown slower, and have thoroughly taken the model through all stunts, your practice time can be cut.

This model is equipped with differential flaps. I have had this idea for sometime now, experimenting with every model I have built since the idea first came to mind. Some modelers have gone along with the idea and some have not. I first put it into the T-bird. I was out of town at the time the T-bird plans were finalized and the way I had hooked up my controls and the way the plans for the kit were drawn were quite different. But even my method in the beginning was not as good as it might have been. After some criticism as to

Thank you for your interest


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