Full Size Printed Plan Scale 1:72 British Columbia Lake Steamer Suitable for Display or Radio Control

$29.95


Full Size Printed Plan & Building Notes

No material plans only

VINTAGE SCALED DRAWINGS FROM 1961

British Columbia Lake Steamer

A fascinating personal reminiscence of a bygone type of ship

Full Size printed plans on Two 44" x 36" and 44" x 20" Sheets

(Text is blurry in places but still readable)

Eight page article lots of description and photos

THERE ARE A NUMBER OF NOTES DETAILS and SKETCHES

TO ASSIST YOU IN BUILDING including DECK CHAIRS

ON THE DRAWINGS

Scale 1:72

Length 30 5/8"

Beam 5 1/16”

Power electric or small steam

Suitable for Display or Radio Control

(No installation shown)

By A. W. B. Prowse, A.M.R.I.N.A.

MOST people know of the old Mississippi River paddle steamers, but there was an equally inter­esting and important, if less well known, type of paddle steamer with a single stern wheel used on all the principal lakes and most of the rivers of British Columbia and the Northern parts of Canada. Similar craft were also used in the Western D.S.A., in fact they were known in general, as the Western River type.

At the turn of the century and more or less up to the last war, several plied on each of the B.C. lakes (Koo­tenay, Okenagan, Arrow and Slocan). On the first named lake there were, from 1910 to their final scrapping over the years from 1923 to 1957, NELSON 134.4 ft. x 26.5 ft., KOKANEE 142.5 ft. x 24.8 ft., MOYIE 161.7 ft. x 30.1 ft. and 729 tons gross, KUSKANOOK 193.5 ft. x 30.9 ft. and 1,008 tons gross and NASOOKIN 200 ft. and 1,896 tons gross with about 1,200 h.p. The other lakes had similar fleets and all of them were owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway, though in the early days on Kootenay Lake several other boats were owned and run by the American Great Northern Railroad Company.

In the early days (and later, on the more inaccessible Northern rivers), I believe they were wood burners and there would have been regular depots along the route at which they could replenish their bunkers. Due to their shallow draft and stern wheel, they were ideal for the work they were designed to do, being able to nose into the shore anywhere, and with the stern wheel less likely to damage than side paddle wheels would be from running aground or by floating logs and debris which came down the rivers and lakes in such quantities when the water rose in the spring from the melting of the snow.

Thank you for looking

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