Full size printed plan SCALE 'O' GAUGE Covered Bridge  perfect nostalgic touch
Full size printed plan SCALE 'O' GAUGE Covered Bridge  perfect nostalgic touch
Full size printed plan SCALE 'O' GAUGE Covered Bridge  perfect nostalgic touch
Full size printed plan SCALE 'O' GAUGE Covered Bridge  perfect nostalgic touch
Full size printed plan SCALE 'O' GAUGE Covered Bridge  perfect nostalgic touch

Full size printed plan SCALE 'O' GAUGE Covered Bridge perfect nostalgic touch

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Full size printed plan and article

No material, Plans only

Covered Bridge

YOU MAY MODIFY TO SUIT YOUR LAYOUT

FULL SIZE PLAN on a 21” x 15” Sheet

Three page article

SCALE O GAUGE

LENGTH 19”

HEIGHT 7”

WIDTH 3”

By RAYMOND OVRESAT

    A RAILROAD covered bridge would be an unusual addition for your pike, out of place on your main line but perfect for that branch line whose budget is pretty skimpy. It is a perfect nostalgic touch for your .branch line and its an­tiquated rolling stock.

First decide just where your bridge and trestle are to be located before you begin actual construction. If your line is merely crossing a small stream, you will not need the trestle. But if you have a large valley to cross, the trestle is just the ticket. Exact measurements depend' on location of your model, while the plans and photos give you construction hints. So get both the height and length you'll be using and then get started.

Construct the trestle first, using strong basswood which will support the train. Two stringers which support the ties can be made as long as the entire gap being spanned. Do not cut them off where the trestle work terminates as they pass through the Bridge supporting the ties inside the bridge as well. Finish the trestle leaving the rails and paint job for later.

Begin bridge construction with the under structure, Two stone masonry piers and centre reinforcing crib are made from balsa, carved to represent stone blocks. Cut piers to size and layout stones in pencil. Using a sharp knife, cut into mor­tar joints and shape individual stones. With a little sanding and a .good paint  job you'll make a realistic job. Build up the timber reinforcing crib from bass­wood and glue onto stone base.....

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