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full size printed plans peanut scale "lederlin 380l flying flea" the "flea" is hard to beat
full size printed plans peanut scale "lederlin 380l flying flea" the "flea" is hard to beat
full size printed plans peanut scale "lederlin 380l flying flea" the "flea" is hard to beat
full size printed plans peanut scale "lederlin 380l flying flea" the "flea" is hard to beat
full size printed plans peanut scale "lederlin 380l flying flea" the "flea" is hard to beat

Full size printed plans Peanut Scale "LEDERLIN 380L Flying Flea" the "Flea" is hard to beat

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Full size printed plans No material

LEDERLIN 380L Flying Flea

When it comes to flying surface area within a 13 inch wingspan, the "Flea" is hard to beat, whether it's a tail-less biplane, a tandem-wing monoplane, or a big-tailed parasol ... take yer cherce

Full size printed plan on a sheet 11” x 17”

Three page article with building notes and photos

Peanut Scale

Wingspan 13”

Power Rubber

By WALT MOONEY

The Flying Flea has been a popular and controversial airplane almost from the first flight of Henri Mignet's original Pou Du Ciel. Of course, the accurate translation of 'Pou' into English is 'Louse', which maybe explains things a little. There were lots of versions of the Flying Flea, almost as many as there were builders of this early and some­times disastrous homebuilt airplane. This version is the Lederlin 380 L 'Flying Flea', and the model was drawn up from a three-view that appeared in the March 1969 issue of Sport Aviation, which is published by the Experimental Aircraft Association, of Hales Corners, Wiscon­sin. Although the three-view shows a spinner, none of the photos in the article show one, so the model does not have a spinner. There is a fine article by John W. Underwood on Henri Mignet and the Pou Du Ciel in the Premier Issue of 'Air Trails', which came out in the fall of 1976. In the article, there is a very sim­ilar three-view of the Lederlin version and some others, and a considerable number of photographs of various ver­sions, but none, unfortunately, of the Lederlin aircraft. Whether you see the Flea as a tail-less biplane or a tandem wing monoplane, or a big-tailed parasol, it looks like an inter­esting Peanut Scale subject. There is a lot of supporting surface and an inter­esting shape.

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