Full size printed plans Peanut Scale “Martinsyde S-1” makes it a fine choice for a first-time Peanut biplane.
Full size printed plans Peanut Scale “Martinsyde S-1” makes it a fine choice for a first-time Peanut biplane.
Full size printed plans Peanut Scale “Martinsyde S-1” makes it a fine choice for a first-time Peanut biplane.
Full size printed plans Peanut Scale “Martinsyde S-1” makes it a fine choice for a first-time Peanut biplane.
Full size printed plans Peanut Scale “Martinsyde S-1” makes it a fine choice for a first-time Peanut biplane.

Full size printed plans Peanut Scale “Martinsyde S-1” makes it a fine choice for a first-time Peanut biplane.

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Full size printed plans No material

“Martinsyde S-1”

This 1914 British design is more successful as a Peanut Scale model than it was As a WWI fighter/reconnaissance aircraft. Simple design makes it a fine choice for a first-time Peanut biplane.

Full size printed plan on a sheet 11” x 17”

Three page article with building notes and photos

Peanut Scale

Wingspan 13”

Power Rubber

By JOHNBERRYMAN

   ln the fall of 1914, the Martinsyde company introduced an airplane that surely must have caused charges of industrial espionage to flutter around Blighty. As you can see, the Martinsyde S-1 looks very much like a 'Sopwith Tabloid, except it's got a real landing gear! Yes, the nose moment is still tiny, and the stabilizing surfaces could always be bigger, but those accident-prone nose-over skids thatTabloids have are gone! Sad to say, the Martinsyde didn't have much of a career. About sixty of the 80-hp Gnome-powered craft were ordered, deliveries taking place until October of 1915. Only six of .the ships made it to France, where they were not well liked due to the poor lateral control furnished by the S-l's tiny ailerons. To add insult to injury, the Martinsyde was slow (87 mph) and climbing performance was poor. The narrow landing gear must have made ground-handling a bit thrilling, as well. After flunking out in front-line service, some S-l's .were sent to Mesopotamia, where sand and indifferent maintenance further degraded their performance. The Z-1's last chance at front-line glory came when a few of them were armed with an assortment of bombs, grenades and incendiary darts for use as anti-zeppelin aircraft. One 5-1 based with No. 6 Squad ron, Royal Flying Corps, is described as having been armed with a Lewis gun carried on the center section.

   While not a beginner's aircraft, the Martinsyde is a fair flier, and can be made to fly with less heartache than some

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