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full size printed plans scale 1 ¾” =1ft  control line hughes h-1 racer is a joy to fly.
full size printed plans scale 1 ¾” =1ft  control line hughes h-1 racer is a joy to fly.
full size printed plans scale 1 ¾” =1ft  control line hughes h-1 racer is a joy to fly.
full size printed plans scale 1 ¾” =1ft  control line hughes h-1 racer is a joy to fly.
full size printed plans scale 1 ¾” =1ft  control line hughes h-1 racer is a joy to fly.
full size printed plans scale 1 ¾” =1ft  control line hughes h-1 racer is a joy to fly.

Full size Printed Plans Scale 1 ¾” =1ft Control Line HUGHES H-1 RACER is a joy to fly.

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Description

Full size Printed Plans & Article

Not a KIT or MODEL No Material

Reproduced Vintage Plan From 1963

HUGHES H-1 RACER

Full size printed plans on a 69” x 24” sheet

Six page article with building notes and photos

Scale 1 ¾” =1ft

Control Line with J. Roberts control system

Wingspan 44”

Engine .29 to .60

By WALTER MUSC1ANO

This scale produces a man-sized airplane which is a joy to fly. We installed a J. Roberts control system, which uses a third line to actuate simultaneous engine speed and flap control. Any engine from .29 to .60 cubic inch displacement can be used and it should be fitted with a speed control attachment specifically designed for it. For best results the engine should have a factory equipped control such as a Johnson Throttle Master or a Roberts Vari-Speed.

   On September 13, 1935 the Federation Aeronautique International (F.A.I.) officials were gathered at the three kilometer, or 1.86 mile, speed course. Young Hughes climbed into the cockpit of his spindle-legged silver, blue, and yellow racer and took off. He headed into the distant sky and then returned to streak across the measured course. Again and again the 1,000 horsepower Pratt and Whitney, Twin Wasp powered speedster raced over the course until six dashes had been completed. But as the jubilant flyer turned to land, the giant engine sputtered and gasped, and finally stopped. A glance at the instruments showed that the fuel tank was empty! In directing his full attention to the record attempt the pilot had neglected to check his fuel gage. As the craft lost altitude Hughes realized that he was too low to bail out and he knew he could not reach the landing field. He quickly headed for a nearby farm and made a belly landing on a plowed field. Despite the crash landing the flight was very successful and Hughes, who had attained an average speed of 352.39 miles per hour, became the holder of the world landplane speed record.

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