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Full size Printed Plans Scale 2 3/16” = 1’  Control Line CASSUTT SPECIAL II
Full size Printed Plans Scale 2 3/16” = 1’  Control Line CASSUTT SPECIAL II
Full size Printed Plans Scale 2 3/16” = 1’  Control Line CASSUTT SPECIAL II
Full size Printed Plans Scale 2 3/16” = 1’  Control Line CASSUTT SPECIAL II

Full size Printed Plans Scale 2 3/16” = 1’ Control Line CASSUTT SPECIAL II

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Full size Printed Plans & Article

Not a KIT or MODEL No Material

CASSUTT SPECIAL II

Full Size printed plan on a 44” x 36” sheet

Two page article with building notes

Scale 2 3/16” = 1’

Control Line

Wingspan 29”

Engines .35

BY FRANK W. BEAITY

One of the midwest's finest model designers pays special tribute to a fine flying machine via a sleek, appealing Ukie. Generous chord results in 300 square inch wing area; takes an enclosed .35

   A model of this tiny ship must be built to a large scale if it is to be more than watch fob size: Even though scaled to 2-3/16 inches to the foot, our model still only spans 29 inches. Sounds small­ish, but a 10.5" wing chord gives us more than 300 square inches of wing area and our throttle-equipped Fox 35 is completely enclosed in the cheek cowls of a 34" fuselage. The extremely thin wing (true scale thickness 9/16"), very small tail surfaces and closely cowled engine were matters of concern prior to testing, but all fears have proved groundless. No engine cooling problems have come up even in our hot, dry midwest weather.

   

 In 1958, after twelve years, improved materials and techniques allowed one rule, the 500-lb minimum weight, to be dropped. A second generation of Midget Racers, even tinier and lighter than those earlier machines, sprang forth. Lightest of the first new "light-weights" was the Cassutt Special II designed, built, and raced by a 12,000 hour T.W.A. veteran, Capt. Thomas H. Cassutt. Tom Cassutt had already gained' consider­able fame with his earlier designs. But this new racer was a truly tiny craft that weighed just 444-lbs and sported a very thin wing, only 31/2 inches thick, that spanned just 13-ft 8-in. This new mount was clocked at better than 205- mph at the National Championship Races in 1959 and has proved to be a top contender in its class. 

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