Mississippi stern wheeler 33" St. louis belle 1:64 scale Full Size Printed plan for Radio control or display

$14.98


Full Size Printed Plans and Article
ST. LOUIS BELLE
Scale 1/64
THIS MODEL IS TYPICAL ONLY AND DOES NOT REPRESENT A SPECIFIC BOAT
LENGTH 33 INCH
BEAM 8 INCH
ELECTRIC MOTORS or STEAM
MULTI CHANNEL RADIO CONTROL or DISPLAY
Drawing of a Mississippi stern wheeler
Full Size Printed on a sheets 45” x30”
Three Page Article and photos
It is recommended that only those with a fair amount of experience undertake it. It is not an easy model to build from the practical working aspect, though as a non working decoration it offers few problems.
Only some build suggestions
ississippi in the early part of the last century; the boats themselves were gaudy and heavily smothered with "gingerbread", but the men they bred and the traditions that became so rapidly established were no less extrovert and outrageous. Before coming in sight of a landing point, pitch pine would be flung on to the boilers to produce dense clouds of the blackest possible smoke, and the same impressive display of smoke would be created before departure. Hustle and bustle, not always strictly necessary, was part of a call. and helped to create an atmosphere of excitement. A race between two steamboats, usually announced weeks in advance, would induce a state of enthusiasm rising to near hysteria which, from records, appears to have far exceeded the excitement attending a present day Cup Final or similar sporting event.
Building a Model
With our plans it is customary to draw in structural details but in the case of this plan so much depends of the individual builder and what he wishes to install that we have decided to leave the question of access to him. The obvious way where a lot of space is required is to cut two sheet members to brace the main deck to its proper sheer and make the hull detachable from beneath the deck. This avoids the necessity of disturbing any of the detail work. An alternative would be to split the saloon deck so that the top of the superstructure lifted off to give access to the main deck engine housing. Many boats carried the engine housing forward to the main stairs, i.e., the boilers, etc., were all enclosed,

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